Baked neeps and tatties recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

This is a bit of an embellishment on the usual neeps and tatties. Omit the parsnips and substitute more swede if you'd like.

68 people made this

IngredientsServes: 9

  • 1.6L chicken stock
  • 1.4kg floury potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 700g swede, peeled and cubed
  • 600g parsnips, peeled and cubed
  • 8 cloves garlic
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 175g butter, softened
  • 3 onions, thinly sliced
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

MethodPrep:40min ›Cook:1hr15min ›Ready in:1hr55min

  1. Combine chicken stock, potatoes, swede, parsnips, garlic, bay leaf and thyme in a large pot. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat and cover partially. Simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 30 minutes. Drain.
  2. Transfer vegetables to large bowl. Add 125g butter. Using an electric mixer, beat mixture until mashed but still chunky. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer mashed vegetables to a buttered baking dish.
  3. Melt remaining 50g butter in a heavy large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add sliced onions. Saute until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low. Saute until onions are tender and golden brown, about 15 minutes. Spread onions evenly over mashed vegetables.
  4. Preheat oven to 190 C / Gas mark 5. Bake, uncovered, for 25 minutes, or until heated through and top begins to crisp.

Make ahead...

This dish can be prepared up to 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate before baking, then transfer from the fridge straight to the oven the next day.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(66)

Reviews in English (49)

I've never made a similar dish, and made this one using all the ingredients, except no swede (I had none), and didn't measure anything, and less garlic. But, it still came out super tasty, even without putting it in the oven to bake. Great recipe!-05 Feb 2016

This was delicious! It's my first time ever trying neeps and tatties and it was fab. We got a HUGE bunch of turnips in our CSA box this week and I wasn't sure what to do with them so I thought I would try this out. We don't have any parsnips so I did change the recipe accordingly and cut it down by a third since I wasn't feeding a crowd. Came out beautifully and tasted delicious. My mom even ate some and complimented the dish! She HATES turnips so take it as a the best of compliments! <3 Thanks for sharing this great recipe.-24 Mar 2013

by notbettycrocker

Made this for Thanksgiving and it was a HUGE hit. It is just the right amount of rutabaga and parsnip to add flavor, but not be overpowering. Best part for me was that I could make it the night before, and 25 minutes before the meal was to be served, I pulled it out of the fridge and popped it into the oven. Will for sure make again.-26 Nov 2005


Baked neeps and tatties recipe - Recipes

Toast the lassies with ‘gallantry’ and ‘farce’ on Burns Night

Burn&rsquos Night falls today, January 25, so why not celebrate Scottish poet Robert Burns the proper way, by whipping up some baked haggis? You can eat haggis whenever you like, but it is almost always dished up on Burns Night for Scots. Haggis contains sheep&rsquos pluck, as we all know, but the meat is also minced with delicious onion, oatmeal, suet, spices and salt. Express.co.uk talks you through BBC Good Food&rsquos Haggis recipe.

Several tonnes of haggis are exported throughout the world to celebrate Burns Night.

Most people get their haggis from a butcher, and recipes will differ from person to person.

However, it&rsquos important to get the basics right.

READ MORE- How to celebrate Robert Burns – Burns Night celebrations

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HOW IS HAGGIS SERVED?

Haggis is traditionally served with neeps and tatties as well as a creamy whisky sauce to pour over the dish.

If you aren't familiar with Scots, neeps is the Scottish name for turnip (which is called swede in England and rutabaga in other parts of the world).

Tatties is the Scots name for potatoes. The potatoes are usually served mashed, as are the neeps.

Check out my guide on How to Cook Neeps and my Creamy Whisky Sauce to serve with the haggis.


Nigel Slater’s spiced goose fat-roasted neeps, tatties and steak recipe

Preheat the oven to 200C/gas mark 6. Put a large pot of water on to boil. Wash, but do not peel, 500g of large floury potatoes, such as Maris Piper, then cut them into big pieces as you would for roast potatoes. Peel 500g of swede then cut them into similar-sized chunks. Cook the potatoes and swede in the boiling water, lightly salted, for 10 minutes or until they are approaching tenderness.

Lightly crush 1 tsp of coriander seeds and another of cumin, using a pestle and mortar or spice mill. Put the spices in a roasting tin set over a moderate heat and toast for a minute or two, till fragrant. Add 5 tbsp of goose fat to the roasting tin. When it has melted, drain the potatoes and swedes in a colander then add them to the hot fat. Toss the vegetables to coat with the fat and spices then put them in the oven and roast for about 40 minutes till crisp and golden.

Season and lightly oil a 500g piece of skirt steak, then cook it on a heated grill or griddle pan until done to your liking. Leave the steak to rest for a few minutes then slice it thickly and serve with the roast vegetables. Serves 2.


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Neeps & Tatties Casserole for #SundaySupper

Casseroles. Heartwarming. Cockle-warming. Finger-to-toe warming. What could be more satisfying on a cold, January night? It’s a huge batch of warm, winter hugs that the the #SundaySupper bunch are cooking up this week, hosted by Alice of A Mama, Baby & Shar-pei in the Kitchen. I’m sharing a bit of Scottish heritage with a Neeps & Tatties casserole, so pull the tartan rug around your shoulders and dive in!

I think I’m going to have my eyes opened this week. When I saw the list of recipes, in my very British way, I raised an eyebrow at the thought of casserole for breakfast or dessert. I never knew such things were possible, so I can see myself trying out a lot of these recipes and widening my casserole horizons!

I know that in American films and TV shows, people are forever taking round casseroles to neighbours in need (do you guys do that in real life?!) but my first-hand knowledge of casseroles comes from the big, delicious pots of stew my mum would cook up for weekend suppers. There’s something so satisfying about a Sunday afternoon spent pottering in the kitchen, putting together a huge cauldron-load of seriously budget-friendly ingredients, cooking them slowly and tenderly, filling the kitchen with warmth and tempting aromas, and then having meals to last for ages. I’ve put two batches of this stew in the freezer, for when I need a quick, hearty supper.

If you’re familiar with the Scots vernacular, then you’ll know that neeps are swedes and tatties are potatoes. Traditionally, they’re mashed up together and served as a side dish, and will always be found on the table for Hogmanay, Burn’s Night, and any other dark winter’s eve when there’s a cause for a feast. I decided to put a twist on this classic dish by using neeps & tatties in a full-on casserole that makes an easy, comforting main dish instead.

To my humble neeps & tatties, I added an onion, a couple of carrots, lentils and split peas to make it a substantial, satisfying dish. I had all the ingredients just lying around in the stock cupboard, but the whole big pot of ingredients probably cost less than £3 (around $4) and easily made enough to feed 6.

Best of all, it’s incredibly versatile. You can serve it simply with a bit of green veg, put it into a pastry case and have it as a hearty pie, pile it onto a bed of spinach and kale, or turn it into a curry and serve with rice. Make a whole load in one go, then save it for a variety of different meals when time is short. You’ll make huge savings on your shopping bill, too.


Hot Baked Tatties (Scottish Baked Potatoes with Haggis)

Serves 2
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 1 hour, 15 minutes
Total time 1 hour, 20 minutes
Meal type Appetizer, Lunch, Main Dish, Snack, Starter
Misc Serve Hot
Occasion Casual Party, Christmas, Formal Party, Halloween, Thanksgiving
Region British
From book The Macsween Haggis Bible

Incredible recipe for haggis baked tatties shared by Scots Michelin Star chef on International Potato Day

Stevie McLaughlin of Restaurant Andrew Fairlie has shared this tasty recipe for Haggis Neeps & Baked Tatties to help you celebrate the world's most versatile vegetable.

To celebrate one of the world&aposs tastiest vegetables on International Potato Day, Stevie McLaughlin, head chef at Scotland’s only two Michelin Star establishment, Restaurant Andrew Fairlie, has created a delicious recipe that is sure to have your mouth watering.

Stevie, who is the ambassador chef for top Scottish potato producer Albert Bartlett, has put his own twist on a classic Scottish recipe to mark this celebration of the versatile veg.

Each dish is perfect for the home cook using store cupboard ingredients alongside the Scots producer&aposs popular potatoes and with easy to follow steps.

Read More
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Read More
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Speaking about the unique recipe, Stevie said: “We’re in the habit of celebrating potatoes every day at Restaurant Andrew Fairlie, so we had a lot of fun putting our own twist on these classic Scottish recipes.

"Albert Bartlett potatoes are famous for their quality and versatility, so this dish is both incredibly tasty yet simple to make.

“We hope you enjoy preparing and eating it as much as we enjoyed putting it together. I’d love to see your efforts on social media once you’ve tried your hand at them, just make sure you remember to take a picture before you tuck in.”

Haggis, Neeps and Baked Tatties

What you&aposll need:

4 Large Albert Bartlett Rooster Potatoes

100g Peeled & Diced Carrot

How to make it: (Serves 4)

Preheat Oven to 200°C then brush the potatoes with the oil and sprinkle with the sea salt.

Put the potatoes into the oven and bake for 40-50 minutes.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool until you can comfortably pick them up.

Meanwhile, put the diced veg into a pot and cover the veg with cold water.

Add a good pinch of salt and bring to the boil.

Simmer the vegetables until tender, approx. 35 minutes.

Drain the vegetables into a colander, discard the water then tip the vegetables back into the pot they were cooked in. Heat them on a low heat to allow them to dry out a little.

Turn off the heat and mash them with a potato masher.

Fold 30g of the unsalted butter into the neeps and carrots.

Add a little salt & pepper and keep warm until needed.

Follow the heating instructions for the haggis – microwave is best!

Have the haggis & neeps warm and ready for the next stage.

When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, cut them lengthways in half and scoop out all the flesh into a bowl.

Brush the empty potato ‘shells’ with some of the melted butter.

Return the shells to the oven and bake until they turn golden inside and start to crispen – 8-10 mins approx.

When the scooped potato flesh is still warm beat the remaining 50g unsalted butter into the potato and then fold the warm milk into the buttery mash.

Add the chopped parsley and a little salt & pepper.

Keep the mashed potato warm for the next stage.

How to put together for the perfect look:

Spoon a layer of mashed neeps / carrots into the bottom of each ‘shell’.

Top the neeps with a layer of warm crumbled haggis and smooth with the back of a spoon.

Now top the haggis with generous topping of the buttery rooster mash. Its ok if it’s a little spikey and uneven.

Sprinkle each haggis, neep & baked tattie with the remaining melted butter.

Put the filled potatoes back into the oven and bake until the spikey edges have turned golden and crispy.


How to cook haggis, neeps and tatties

Burn’s Night falls today, January 25, so why not celebrate Scottish poet Robert Burns the proper way, by whipping up some baked haggis? You can eat haggis whenever you like, but it is almost always dished up on Burns Night for Scots. Haggis contains sheep’s pluck, as we all know, but the meat is also minced with delicious onion, oatmeal, suet, spices and salt. Express.co.uk talks you through BBC Good Food’s Haggis recipe.

Several tonnes of haggis are exported throughout the world to celebrate Burns Night.

Most people get their haggis from a butcher, and recipes will differ from person to person.

However, it’s important to get the basics right.


Haggis Neeps & Tatties Stack with My Whiskey Sauce

If you’ve never tried Haggis then you are missing an absolute treat! I love Haggis Neeps & Tatties and always try them out when visiting Scotland.

Here’s my take on this famous Scottish dish…To be honest, I’ve never seen Scottish Oat/Porridge used in any recipe for the Whiskey Sauce but I think it adds a little “tourist” tradionality to the dish.

Top Tip:
You’ll need an empty tin can (old baked bean tin works perfectly) to use to stack the ingredients to give it that “chefy” look! (Obviously you’ll need to clean it and remove the paper cover) Or you can buy stainless steel rings from any good kitchenware retailer…

Ingredients

  • 700g Haggis
  • 520g Neeps (Swede) - Hot Mashed
  • 520g Tatties (Potatoes) - Hot Mashed
  • For The Whiskey Sauce
  • 2 x Shallots - Finely Chopped
  • 15ml Whiskey
  • 125ml Beef Stock
  • 100ml Double Cream
  • Knob of Butter
  • 1 x Dsp Tomato Puree
  • 1 x Dsp Porridge Oats

Method

Step 1

First cook your Haggis according to the instructions on the packaging. Typically involves boiling/simmering it in water.

Step 2

While your Haggis is cooking, prepare your potatoes (tatties) & swede (neeps) in separate pans. These need to be mashed and seasoned with butter salt and pepper. I like mine quite "rustic" (lumpy - but not too lumpy - but not perfectly smooth either!) - Keep warm until ready to "stack".

Step 3

Step 4

In a saucepan sauté the finely chopped shallots in the butter until softened. Add the whiskey and flame to burn off the alcohol then add the stock, oats and tomato puree. Simmers and reduce by about a 1/3. Add the cream and continue to simmer to thicken your sauce a little - season to taste.

Step 5

When all ready get your cleaned tin cans and brush the insides with a little oil and place on a strong baking tray. Place 1/4 of the haggis in to each ring and press down with a spatula to get rid of any air pockets. Then do the same with the swede (neeps) and finally the potatoes (tatties). TIP: When all ingredients are stacked in each tin place the lid of a tin on top to finally press your stack down.

Step 6

Now place all four stacks in a pre heated oven 175 °C for 25 to 30 minutes

Step 7

To serve place in the middle of your warmed plate - use the tin top again to help push the stack out from the tin! Pour a little of the whiskey sauce over each stack, enjoy!


Watch the video: Η Μαριάντα Πιερίδη έκανε τα πιο τέλεια φρύδια και χείλη Ημιμόνιμο Μακιγιάζ tattoo στο YPBE


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