Jaden Smith Sues Vegan Startup Over Packaging



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Jaden Smith has beef with an animal-product-free business

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Jaden Smith, son of actors Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith and co-founder of start-up water company Just Water, is suing Hampton Creek Inc. over trademark issues, Bloomberg writes. Just Goods Inc., which sells the water in recyclable cartons, alleges that Hampton Creek violated an agreement the two companies had signed over logos and marketing.

Bloomberg reports that after encountering marketing difficulties, Hampton Creek — well-known for their vegan mayonnaise, Just Mayo — changed its website and product packaging to emphasize the word “just.” On July 30, Just Goods filed a complaint in the California state court in San Francisco alleging that the brand revision had violated a preexisting contract signed by Hampton Creek CEO Joshua Tetrick, which said the company must adhere to a previous design with a smaller cursive font unless granted permission to do otherwise by Just Goods.


Smith, 19, himself an actor and rapper, created Just Water in 2012 with former record label executive Drew Fitzgerald. The packaging is made of certified paper, plant-based plastic, traditional plastic, and aluminum.

Smith's water brand may be relatively eco-friendly, but there are still plenty of reasons to not drink bottled water.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Impossible Foods Wades into Fishless Fish

After plant-based beef, poultry, and pork, it seems the next logical step for alternative “meat” producers is fishless fish. Joining the slew of food companies developing plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to commercially fished seafood is Impossible Foods, the maker of “bleeding” plant-based burgers like those now found in Burger King locations across the nation, the New York Times reports.

Impossible, per the Times’ report, is looking to reconfigure its plant-based beef recipe — which uses heme to replicate the texture, taste, and aroma of beef — to create fishless fish. Last month the company R&D team was able to produce anchovy-flavored broth made from plants, to be used in a paella.

With 90 percent of the world’s marine fish stocks depleted, primarily due to overfishing, plant-based or lab-grown fish could have the potential for a huge environmental impact. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not there is an appetite among consumers for fake fish.


Watch the video: Jaden Smith Opens Up Free Vegan Food Truck on Skid Row for Birthday! Will u0026 Jada REACT!


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